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Remember the PDP 11

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              PDP 11/05  ( 1972 )                                         PDP11/20   ( 1970 )

DIGITAL introduces the PDP-11/05 and PDP-11/10 as the first "inexpensive" PDP-11s.

 

The PDP-11/20, the first of DIGITAL's 16-bit family of machines, is delivered.

pdp11-05.jpg (21572 bytes)   pdp11-20.jpg (13427 bytes)


                  PDP11/23  ( 1979 )                                   PDP11/24 ( 1981 )

The PDP-11/23 was positioned between the low-end PDP-11/03 and the PDP-11/34 in order to round out DIGITAL'S 16-bit product line and bridge the gap between existing microcomputers and mid-range systems.

 

The PDP-11/24 was a fourth generation PDP-11 system designed to increase DIGITAL's penetration of the Technical and Commercial OEM markets. The new machine featured Large Scale Integration, 1 MB memory capacity and the PDP-11 UNIBUS.

pdp11-23.jpg (11608 bytes)    pdp11-24.jpg (12611 bytes)


                PDP11/34  ( 1975 )                                   PDP11/40 ( 1972 )

The midrange PDP-11/34 was DIGITAL's most successful PDP-11 in terms of unit volume. The 11/34 featured a CPU so compact that the entire CPU logic was contained on two circuit boards. This provided greater flexiblity during later system expansion by making additional chassis space available.

 

The PDP-11/40 offered approximately twice the processing power of the earlier PDP-11/20. A floating point package was offered as an option, making the cost slightly lower than the 11/20.


pdp11-34.jpg (15145 bytes)    pdp11-40.jpg (26406 bytes)


           PDP11/44  ( 1979 )                                   PDP11/45 ( 1971 )

The PDP-11/44 incorporated the complete PDP-11/70 instruction set and memory expansion into 1MB in a lower-cost package. The PDP-11/44 was the last PDP-11 implemented in discrete logic.

 

The PDP-11/45 was an excellent computational tool for large multi-user, multi-task installations. Through memory management, memory could be expanded to 128K, which included a combination of bi-polar and MOS memory. Other features included a greatly expanded floating point processor.


pdp11-44.jpg (23117 bytes)    pdp11-45-2.jpg (265362 bytes)

                  PDP11/60   ( 1977 )                                          PDP11/70 ( 1975 )

The PDP-11/60 offered a combination of unique attributes, which were normally found in larger, more expensive computers at the time. Designed around the proven UNIBUS architecture, the PDP-11/60 included user control store features previously unavailable from DIGITAL as well as several 11/70 class features such as cache memory and RAMP.

 

The PDP-11/70 represented the high end of PDP-11 architecture with the capacity for supporting the speed, addressing range and bandwidth required in large systems applications. It was the first PDP-11 to use cache memory.

pdp11-60.jpg (13820 bytes)    pdp11-70.jpg (25537 bytes)

                      PDP11/94 ( 1990 )

The 20th anniversary of the first PDP-11 computer is marked by the introduction of two new PDP-11 systems: the MicroPDP-11/93 and the PDP-11/94.

Both the MicroPDP-11/93 and the PDP-11/94 offered a performance increase of up to 40% over the previous high-end PDP-11 systems. The new machines were the latest members of the longest-lived family of general-purpose computers. At this point, the series included over 20 members; more than 600,000 had been installed.

pdp11-93.jpg (10764 bytes)
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Copyright 1998 [Cornelis van Pieterson, The Netherlands].
All rights reserved.

Revised: May 31, 2007